Rodrigo Mancilla Fuentes

Rodrigo Mancilla was born in Coyhaique city, in southern Chile in 1989. In 2007, Rodrigo started his bachelor degree in Physical Education at the Universidad de la Frontera, Temuco. In 2011, he began his first master in physical activity and health at Universidad de la Frontera, under the supervision of Dr. Erik Diaz. Studying at the center for investigating human metabolism and health, Rodrigo published his thesis about the effects of high-intensity interval training on glycaemic control in pre-type 2 diabetic subjects. In 2014, Rodrigo received a national award from the Chilean commission of investigation, sciences and technology (CONICYT) to pursue a second master degree at Maastricht University, specifically the human movement sciences master program. During his internship, Rodrigo worked under the supervision of Prof. Matthijs Hesselink and Dr. Vera Schrauwen-Hinderling, studying the in-vivo diurnal metabolic variations of human liver tissue.

In 2016, Rodrigo received a second award from the Chilean commission of investigation, sciences and technology (CONICYT) to pursue his PhD at the department of human movement science-human biology under the supervision of Prof. Matthijs Hesselink and Dr. Vera Schrauwen-Hinderling. During his PhD, Rodrigo will primarily focus on effects of regular exercise training in muscle tissue remodeling in relation to insulin sensitivity and mitochondrial function in insulin resistant subjects, taking into account a cellular, multiple tissue, and whole body approach. In his main PhD project, Rodrigo will determine whether high intensity exercise-induced skeletal muscle glycogen turnover restore insulin sensitivity.

In addition, Rodrigo will explore some potential underlying mechanisms regarding the metabolic event of mitochondrial inertia at the onset of exercise by using non-invasive magnetic resonance spectroscopy methodology in lean healthy and metabolic compromised subjects. Rodrigo expects to identify putative targets to overcome mitochondrial inertia at the onset of exercise in order to counteract early muscle fatigue.